click on the images above to visit those web sites
Route1. Carmarthen to Llansteffan circular route. Good for bikes, small country roads. Some hills. From Carmarthen take the Johnstown road, the B4312, signed to Llansteffan. Just past the village of Llangain, take the right turn down a lane, following the sign saying Merlin’s Quoit.   SN37911598. It may be necessary to park on the main road through the village, and walk down the lane. The Quoit is at the end of the lane. More info here about pubs etc
From Merlin’s Quoit it is possible to see the stones of Meini Llwydion from the B4312 in a field next to the road. Not safe from a car. ????? Not sure if there is any public access, though there is a information board when you get there.
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Merlin’s quoits.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of Merlin’s quoits.
Click here to open Google maps in a new page for travel directions to Merlin’s Quoits.
Merlin’s Quoits Meini Llwydion Merlin’s Quoits
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Meini Llwydion
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of Meini Llwydion
Next accessible site is Maen Melyn and is further down the B4312 towards Llansteffan. Just before the Towy Boat Club at Pilglas turn right down a sweet little lane off the main road, signed Llanybri. Maen Melyn is a standing stone embedded into the hedge, halfway there, at a fork in the road.
Maen Melyn. Towy Boat Club Pilglas
You can then turn left and head down to Llansteffan, where there are toilets, and several places to get food and drinks, plus a nice beach and big car park. Up the lane past the church, at the start of the footpath on the right, is the remains of Fron Ucha, chambered tomb.
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Maen Melyn.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of  Maen Melyn.
Maen Melyn. Fron Ucha
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Fron Ucha.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of Fron Ucha.
It is then possible to walk round either along the beach when the tide is out, or along a marked footpath higher up,to St.Anthonys well. A dear little well, housed in a tiny stone room beside the path up from the beach.
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about St.Anthonys well.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of St.Anthonys well.
Fron Ucha St.Anthonys well
The next site is found by heading back up towards Llanybri, bearing left past the church, and reaching an unusual arrangement of stones. These are sometimes called Maen Llwyd and Meini Llwydion, which basically means “grey/holy stones”but their actual name is  Gors Llangynog.  These are accessed by a footpath, from the Pilgrims Rest and an ancient church, and are well worth a visit.
St.Anthonys well Fron Ucha Maen Melyn.
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Gors Llangynog.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of  Gors Llangynog.
From here , return to the crossroads and head for Langynog and the burial chamber Twlc y Filiast.   This is accessible from a footpath, to look at, though actual touching may not be possible.
Gors Llangynog Gors Llangynog Twlc y Filiast Maen Melyn.
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Twlc y Filiast.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of Twlc y Filiast.
Finally, a fascinating earthwork can be seen from the road, Bryn Cywyn.  A huge rectangle once held timber buildings, around the first and second century AD. The outline can be clearly made out. It is now possible to return to Carmarthen, either on the A40 trunk road, a mile or so away, or back through Llangynog and the road to Johnstown.
Bryn Cywyn Twlc y Filiast
Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Bryn Cywyn.
Click here to open the ordinance survey website for a detailed map of Bryn Cywyn.
A40
If you would be interested in discussing our work further, and seeing what could be done at your site, please contact us.
click on the images above to visit those web sites
click on the images above to visit those web sites
Route1. Carmarthen to Llansteffan circular route. Good for bikes, small country roads. Some hills. From Carmarthen take the Johnstown road, the B4312, signed to Llansteffan. Just past the village of Llangain, take the right turn down a lane, following the sign saying Merlin’s Quoit.   SN37911598. It may be necessary to park on the main road through the village, and walk down the lane. The Quoit is at the end of the lane. Click here to open Google maps in a new page for travel directions to Merlin’s Quoits. Click here to open the megalithic portal website for more information about Merlin’s quoits Click here to open the ordinance survey website for more info It is then possible to see the stones of Meini Llwydion SN 37721534 form the road, in a field next to the road. Not safe from a car. Not sure if there is any public access, though there is a information board when you get there. NEED FIXING! Next accessible site is down a sweet little lane off the main road, signed Llanybri. There is a standing stone embedded into the hedge, halfway there, at a fork in the road. Maen Melyn.SN 34711279 NEEDS CLEARING AND SIGNING. You can then turn left and head down to Llansteffan, where there are toilets, and several places to get food and drinks, plus a nice beach and big car park.Up the lane past the church, at the start of the footpath on the right, is the remains of Fron Ucha,chambered tomb.SN 34551074. NEEDSFIXING. It is then possible to walk round either along the beach when the tide is out, or along a marked footpath higher up,to St.Anthonys well. SN 34600993.  A dear little well, housed in a tiny stone room beside the path up from the beach. The next site is found by heading up towards Llanybri, bearing left past the church, and reaching an unusual arrangement of stones. These are sometimes called Maen Llwyd and Meini Llwydion, which basically means “grey/holy stones”but their actual name is  Gors Llangynog. SN 312140. These are accessed by a footpath, from the Pilgrims Rest SN 310131,and an ancient church, and are well worth a visit. 1 NEEDS STANDING UP. From here , return to the crossroads and head for Langynog and the burial chamber Twlc y Filiast. SN 33811618. This is accessible from a footpath, to look at, though actual touching may not be possible. NEEDS FIXING! Finally, a fascinating earthwork can be seen from the road, Bryn Cywyn. SN 33551660. A huge rectangle once held timber buildings, around the first and second century AD. The outline can be clearly made out. It is now possible to return to Carmarthen, either on the A40 trunk road, a mile or so away, or back through Llangynog and the road to Johnstown. These dolmens are a major feature in west Wales. They were obviously an important structure to our ancestors, and my sense is that they were like artificial caves. We know that the actual caves along the Gower coast were used by people over  30,000 years ago, and the idea of a cave, a safe place which endured through the centuries, must have been an attractive thought for our ancestors. The bones or ashes of the dead could be brought here, and then their spirits could be contacted, perhaps initiations and other important ceremonies could be enacted within those walls. They might have hung animal hides at the gaps, to make a secure and warm space….By visiting these ancient sites, we too can contact the spirits of the past, and admire the effort that has meant these sites have lasted through thousands of years.
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